4CP Friday

By: Chris Lanier
June 3, 2011

To celebrate the one-year anniversary of 4CP, HiLobrow invited guest curators to assemble themed comic-book-detail galleries from 4CP’s collection. Click here to see all galleries.

***

THEME: RESOLUTION
CURATOR: CHRIS LANIER

Even if John Hilgart hadn’t already started cataloging “Comic Book Cartography,” 4CP would inevitably guide us to the question:

Click image for larger version

AT WHAT RESOLUTION

*

Click on image for larger version

DOES A DRAWING

*

Click on image for larger version

FIND ITS DEFAULT SETTING

*

Click on image for larger version

AS A DIAGRAM OR MAP?

***

SIMILAR HILOBROW SERIES: CHESS MATCH — a gallery | FILE X — a gallery | KIRB YOUR ENTHUSIASM — 25 Jack Kirby panels | SECRET PANEL —Silver Age comics’ double entendres | SKRULLICISM | CURATED: 4CP FTW by John Hilgart | ANNOTATED GIF by Kerry Callen | FANCHILD by Adam McGovern

Share this Post
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Categories

Comics, Spectacles

What do you think?

  1. It’s a tribute to the increasingly gorgeous work of today’s information visualization designers that we can imagine the final panel here as maybe a diagram.

    PS: Great Brian Eno post at 4CP, John!

  2. Thanks, John. I have comics and diagrams on the brain right now — I’ll be giving a presentation on some common pictorial logic in medical diagrams and the work of certain cartoonists in about a week, at the “Comics and Medicine” conference. People have given a lot of thought to the relationship comics have to time — the way comics participate in “diagrammatic space” is a more underexplored area. Kevin Huizenga got me thinking about this in particular. The kind of notational drawing that can happen in comics backgrounds moves objects into a “generic” (or maybe even Platonic) mode that connotes a sort of objectivity when deployed in diagrams or infographics.

    I love the above panel with the figures (scientists?) working on a control panel that looks like a blow-up of a circuit board (as if the designers of the control panel didn’t want to really translate the circuit board into an interface — they just blew it up to a giant size. To tweak the upper buttons and knobs the poor guys need a cherry-picker). And the last one I find really fascinating, open to a number of readings — from estuary to fertilization (or evacuation) figure to Venn Diagram overlap (“At what point on the graph do “must” and “cannot” meet?”).

Comments are closed.